To what extent has invasive riparian vegetation (IRV) treatment reversed channel narrowing and reduced dynamism trends? Paired treated and untreated reaches at 15 sites along 13 rivers were compared before and after treatment using repeat aerial imagery to assess long-term (~10 year) channel change due to treatment on a regional scale across the Southwest U.S. Wieting et al. found that IRV treatment significantly increased channel width and floodplain destruction.

Guide to establishing wetland hydrology, vegetation, and wildlife habitat functions on soils capable of supporting those functions.

Guide to maintain, develop, or improve wetland habitat for waterfowl, shorebirds, fur-bearers, or other wetland dependent or associated flora and fauna.

A guide to restoring wetland function, value, habitat, diversity, and capacity to a close approximation of the pre-disturbance conditions.

Document intended to guide enhancement of soil functions, hydrology, vegetation and habitat specific to wetlands.

Nagler et al. test the assumption that removing saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) will save water and create environments more favourable to these native species. They compared sap flux measurements of water used by native species in contrast to saltcedar, and compared soil salinity, ground water depth and soil moisture across a gradient of 200–1500 m from the river's edge on a floodplain terrace at Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR).

Glenn et al. measure transpiration and stomatal conductance to investigate the environmental constraints on an arid-zone riparian phreatophtye, saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima and related species and hybrids), growing over a brackish aquifer along the Colorado River in the western U.S. Depth to groundwater, meteorological factors, salinity and soil hydraulic properties were compared at stress and non-stressed sites that differed in salinity of the aquifer, soil properties and water use characteristics, to identify the factors depressing water use at the stress site.

In this 2014 poster, Ryan and Harris report preliminary results on a study of evapotranspiration (ET) at the Cibola National wildlife Refuge. They ask whether groundwater responds to a massive change in ET of surface vegetation and assess baseline well and evapotranspiration data as a proxy for the anticipated tamarisk beetle migration. 

Bush et al. use a common garden experiment to study drought sensitivity in non-native tamarisk. They found some populations are more sensitive to soil water deficits than others and that freeze-thaw exposure reduces drought sensitivity. 

Bush, S.E., Guo, J.S., Dehn, D., Grady, K.C., Hull, J.B., Johnson, E., Koepke, D.F., Long, R.W., Potts, D.L. and Hultine, K.R., 2021. Adaptive versus non-adaptive responses to drought in a non-native riparian tree/shrub, Tamarix spp. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 301, p.108342.

2018 Dolores River Restoration Partnership Annual Report