A look at several case studies from conservation practitioners and ornithological social scientists to highlight six core principles of translational ecology - an intentional approach in which researchers and practitioners from multiple disciplines collaborate on conservation management. The authors demonstrate how implementing collaboration, engagement, communication, commitment, process, and decision-framing can lead to improved conservation decision-making and delivery of outcomes applicable to specific management decisions.

A look at beetle-occupied tamarisk sites 11-13 years after initial occupancy to determine long-term vegetative community response. Study found that Tamarix cover across sites initially declined an average of ca. 50% in response to the beetle, but then recovered. Changes in the associated plant community were small but supported common management goals, including a 47% average increase in cover of a native shrub (Salix exigua), and no secondary invasions by other non-native plants.

What site conditions are associated with greater recovery and overall higher cover of willows? Goetz et al. performed a meta-analysis of tamarisk removal and willow (Salix) recovery across the southwest, compiling data from 260 sites where tamarisk was subject to active removal and/or biocontrol and 132 reference sures. Cut-stump method with biological control was the most effective method to improve native species dominance. Willow cover was generally highest in locations with low drought stress, as reflected by soil properties, distance to water, and climate.

A guide that walks the user through the use of the AGOL-based habitat viewer (https://usgs.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=b362c94bd7714969805ab7dd29336ce0). User is provided with instructions for changing base map layers, toggling through data layers, utilizing tools to compare different datasets, and locating the metadata for the provided layers. Manual uses screen shots of the AGOL platform to aid in seamless navigation.

Riverine ecosystems are known to provide important habitat for avian communities, but information on responses of birds to differing levels of Tamarix is not known. Past research on birds along the Colorado River has shown that avian abundance in general is greater in native than in non-native habitat.

In this chapter, Carothers et al have three objectives: first, they document the value of nonnative Tamarix as summer habitat for birds compared to native riparian habitats of mesquite bosques and cottonwood/willow, and mixed deciduous gallery woodlands; second, they specifically focus on the unintended consequences to native avifauna of dam construction, Tamarix invasion, native vertebrate colonization of the Tamarix-dominated riparian habitat, and subsequent biocontrol along approximately 300 miles of the Colorado River in Grand and Glen Canyons; and, third, the

A 2006 review of the saltcedar (Tamarix) biocontrol program. 

 

DeLoach, C.J., Milbrath, L.R., Carruthers, R., Knutson, A.E., Nibling, F., Eberts, D., Thompson, D.C., Kazmer, D.J., Dudley, T.L., Bean, D.W. and Knight, J.B., 2006. Overview of saltcedar biological control. In Monitoring science and technology symposium: unifying knowledge for sustainability in the Western Hemisphere. Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, Colorado (pp. 92-99).

"This case challenges the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s (“APHIS”) 2010 decision to terminate, without taking necessary remedial action, the agency’s program authorizing wide-scale release of an invasive species known as the tamarisk leaf-eating beetle (“beetle”) that is having, and will continue to have, devastating effects on the highly endangered Southwestern willow flycatcher (“flycatcher”) and its habitat, including designated critical habitat."

Ctr. for Biological Diversity v. Vilsack, 276 F. Supp. 3d 1015 (D. Nev. 2017)

In this 2010 Memo from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), USDA - APHIS terminates the tamarisk biocontrol program.

In this November 20, 2014 letter, Secretary of the United States Department of Agriculture Vilsack responds to Senator John McCain regarding impacts of the tamarisk biocontrol program on the federally-listed, endangered southwestern willow flycatcher.