A two-part study looking at how changes in soil salinity affect tamarisk growth and how beetle-induced defoliation affects tamarisk growing in soils with different salinities. Results showed that tamarisk plants grow better in soils with a similar salinity to their own origin site and that lower salinity does not benefit tamarisk plants adapted to higher saline conditions.

A look at beetle-occupied tamarisk sites 11-13 years after initial occupancy to determine long-term vegetative community response. Study found that Tamarix cover across sites initially declined an average of ca. 50% in response to the beetle, but then recovered. Changes in the associated plant community were small but supported common management goals, including a 47% average increase in cover of a native shrub (Salix exigua), and no secondary invasions by other non-native plants.

Does hybridization among tamarisk beetles change the risk of non-target attack in the field? Clark et al. study the consequences of hybridization in  tamarisk beetles (Diorhabda). They paired laboratory phenotyping with genomics to assess changes in risk of non-target attack and body size and fecundity. Body size and early fecundity were similar in pure and hybrid females, indicating that hybridization is not detrimental to insect fitness or the biocontrol program and may provide variation that allows populations to become locally adapted.

What site conditions are associated with greater recovery and overall higher cover of willows? Goetz et al. performed a meta-analysis of tamarisk removal and willow (Salix) recovery across the southwest, compiling data from 260 sites where tamarisk was subject to active removal and/or biocontrol and 132 reference sures. Cut-stump method with biological control was the most effective method to improve native species dominance. Willow cover was generally highest in locations with low drought stress, as reflected by soil properties, distance to water, and climate.

A guide that walks the user through the use of the AGOL-based habitat viewer (https://usgs.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=b362c94bd7714969805ab7dd29336ce0). User is provided with instructions for changing base map layers, toggling through data layers, utilizing tools to compare different datasets, and locating the metadata for the provided layers. Manual uses screen shots of the AGOL platform to aid in seamless navigation.

The leaf beetle Diorhabda elongata Brullé subspecies deserticola Chen, collected in northwestern China, has been released in the western United States to control tamarisk (Tamarix spp.). While beetle establishment and saltcedar defoliation have been noted at northern study sites, this species has not established at latitudes south of the 38th parallel.

The northern tamarisk beetle Diorhabda carinulata (Desbrochers) was approved for release in the United States for classical biological control of a complex of invasive saltcedar species and their hybrids (Tamarix spp.). An aggregation pheromone used by D. carinulata to locate conspecifics is fundamental to colonization and reproductive success.

A presentation by Dan Bean at the 2020 RiversEdge West Conference about new knowledge on aggregation phermones, phenology, and genomics. 

In this chapter, Carothers et al have three objectives: first, they document the value of nonnative Tamarix as summer habitat for birds compared to native riparian habitats of mesquite bosques and cottonwood/willow, and mixed deciduous gallery woodlands; second, they specifically focus on the unintended consequences to native avifauna of dam construction, Tamarix invasion, native vertebrate colonization of the Tamarix-dominated riparian habitat, and subsequent biocontrol along approximately 300 miles of the Colorado River in Grand and Glen Canyons; and, third, the

Remote sensing methods are commonly used to monitor the invasive riparian shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) and its response to the northern tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda carinulata), a specialized herbivore introduced as a biocontrol agent to control tamarisk in the Southwest USA in 2001.