Researchers looked at non-structural carbohydrate storage in different genotypes of Tamarix from an experimental common garden. Results suggest that Tamarix from colder locations cope with freeze events by maintaining large storage pools to support tissue regrowth, but with the trade-off of overall reduced growth and reproduction.

What site conditions are associated with greater recovery and overall higher cover of willows? Goetz et al. performed a meta-analysis of tamarisk removal and willow (Salix) recovery across the southwest, compiling data from 260 sites where tamarisk was subject to active removal and/or biocontrol and 132 reference sures. Cut-stump method with biological control was the most effective method to improve native species dominance. Willow cover was generally highest in locations with low drought stress, as reflected by soil properties, distance to water, and climate.

Bush et al. use a common garden experiment to study drought sensitivity in non-native tamarisk. They found some populations are more sensitive to soil water deficits than others and that freeze-thaw exposure reduces drought sensitivity. 

Bush, S.E., Guo, J.S., Dehn, D., Grady, K.C., Hull, J.B., Johnson, E., Koepke, D.F., Long, R.W., Potts, D.L. and Hultine, K.R., 2021. Adaptive versus non-adaptive responses to drought in a non-native riparian tree/shrub, Tamarix spp. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 301, p.108342.